The New York Times Magazine of April 28, 2013, features a story by cancer survivor Peggy Orenstein entitled “Our Feel-Good War on Breast Cancer.”  The cover story is available online in advance of its publication in the magazine.

Orenstein concludes her lengthy story about breast cancer treatment and research with these strong comments:

“The idea that there could be one solution to breast cancer — screening, early detection, some universal cure — is certainly appealing. All of us — those who fear the disease, those who live with it, our friends and families, the corporations who swathe themselves in pink — wish it were true. Wearing a bracelet, sporting a ribbon, running a race or buying a pink blender expresses our hopes, and that feels good, even virtuous. But making a difference is more complicated than that.

“It has been four decades since the former first lady Betty Ford went public with her breast-cancer diagnosis, shattering the stigma of the disease. It has been three decades since the founding of Komen. Two decades since the introduction of the pink ribbon. Yet all that well-meaning awareness has ultimately made women less conscious of the facts: obscuring the limits of screening, conflating risk with disease, compromising our decisions about health care, celebrating “cancer survivors” who may have never required treating. And ultimately, it has come at the expense of those whose lives are most at risk.”

Read the Article >>

Share This Post
Email this to someoneShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditPin on Pinterest
Tagged with →