CPAT-Members-Capitol-PACT-Act-Symposium-Page
In June, over 50 patient advocates gathered in Washington, D.C. to take part in the NCCS 2016 Cancer Policy & Advocacy Team (CPAT) Symposium and Hill Day.

Days One and Two

Elena and Brandi set up the registration table.

CPAT members at lunch

CPAT member Roberta Albany speaks on camera.

CPAT member Virgie Townsend with NCCS CEO Shelley Fuld Nasso

CPAT members Virgie Townsend, Lisa Goldman, and Jennifer Moulton-Proctor

CPAT members Ben Fishman, Alexandra Lucy, Jonathan Stovall, and NCCS Board Member Laurie Isenberg on the Capitol lawn.

CPAT Steering Committee members and NCCS staff pose for a photo in front of the Capitol dome.

NCCS CEO Shelley Fuld Nasso and CPAT member Carmela DiMaria

CPAT members Jo-Ellen DeLuca and Pamela Moffitt

Elizabeth Goss, JD and NCCS CEO Shelley Fuld Nasso discuss "Current Issues in Cancer Care."

Mary McCabe, RN; Laurie Isenberg; and NCCS staff member Jackie Smith moderate a panel about survivorship.

Karen Scherr from Duke University presents research about doctor/patient communication. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

CPAT member AnneMarie Ciccarella shares her thoughts on cancer care planning. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

CPAT member Brett Wilson talks about disparities of care in rural areas. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

Advocate Kim Hall Jackson talks about cancer care planning. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

NCCS Board Member and Patient Advocate Laurie Isenberg shares her thoughts on shared decision-making. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

NCCS Policy Consultant Kelsey Nepote, CEO Shelley Fuld Nasso, and Director of Communications Dan Weber. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

CEO Shelley Fuld Nasso encouraging advocates to serve on policy committees run by organizations such as NQF or PCORI. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

Valerie Fraser, Marcia Wilson of NQF, and NCCS CEO Shelley Fuld Nasso. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

During a break, CPAT member Jean Di Carlo-Wagner leads attendees with a brief yoga session. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

Symposium attendees were re-grouped by state/region in order to plan for their Hill Day meetings.

NCCS Policy Director Christin Engelhardt gives a rundown on what to expect at meetings with lawmakers on Capitol Hill. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

A group of CPAT advocates listen to a presentation about congressional meetings.

NCCS CEO Shelley Fuld Nasso coaches CPAT members from Texas about their upcoming Hill Day meetings. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

CPAT members Patsy Hinson and Jennifer MacLaren from North Carolina plan their upcoming Hill Day meetings. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

Med students from the CUPID program at Johns Hopkins University attended the CPAT 2016 Symposium.

Survivor advocates Desiree Walker and Richard Gelb facilitate a workshop about improving doctor/patient communication. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

CPAT Steering Committee member Desiree Walker speaks during the workshop. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

CUPID program Co-director Fred Bunz. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

CPAT member Rachel Ferraris talks about doctor/patient communication. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

CUPID students Bernadette Eichman and Janefrances Egbosiuba share their experiences during a workshop dinner. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

CPAT Steering Committee member Jamie Ledezma shares her story of poor communication between doctor & patient. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

CPAT member Wendy Muldrew shares an example of poor doctor/patient communication. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

Attendees heard and participated in a number of informational presentations, including “Current Issues in Cancer Care: The Economics of the Cancer Care System,” “Communications Training: Your Story in a Nutshell,” and “Shared Decision Making and Cancer Care Planning.”

For the final activity on the second day, advocates were joined by medical students taking part in the Cancer in the Under-Privileged Indigent or Disadvantaged (CUPID) program at Johns Hopkins and Indiana Universities. The workshop, “How Survivors Can Improve Patient-Doctor Communications,” was incredibly well received by everyone involved, as survivors and medical students shared their stories and experiences to better understand effective ways to communicate about difficult issues.

Hill Day

CUPID med students and CPAT members meet with Sen. Mikulski's office about the PACT Act. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

CPAT members from New York meet with Sen. Schumer's office about the PACT Act. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

CEO Shelley Fuld Nasso and Board Member Laurie Isenberg check their meeting schedules on Capitol Hill. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

CPAT member Alexandra Lucy gives a "Cancer Sucks" button to a staffer in Rep. Joe Pitts' office. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

A staffer in Rep. Joe Pitts' office wears an NCCS Cancer Sucks button during a meeting about the PACT Act. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

CPAT members and CEO Shelley Fuld Nasso pose with a staffer from Rep. Joe Pitts' office. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

Advocates from California meet with Sen. Diane Feinstein's office. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

Advocates from California pose in front of Sen. Feinstein's office. (Photo by Leslie E. Kossoff/LK Photos)

CPAT members and CUPID students used what they learned at the symposium to participate in NCCS Hill Day, visiting approximately 75 Congressional offices and speaking with their elected officials about the importance of the Planning Actively for Cancer Treatment (PACT) Act, H.R. 2846. Several Members signed on as cosponsors because they too see the importance of providing Medicare beneficiaries with comprehensive care plans.

You too can get involved. Voice your support for the PACT Act by writing your Member of Congress here.


CPAT Members Share Their Symposium Experiences

Several CPAT members wrote posts about their experience at the symposium and Hill Day.

Sandra Finestone Headshot“The cancer survivors I met at the symposium were empowered. They were empowered to not only improve their lives, but to also make sure that the lives of those they love and the lives of those they have never met could be better.”
Sandra Finestone


Sarah Noonan Headshot“You don’t have to be a policy wonk to make a difference with your legislators! Really, all you need is passion, a little guidance and a willingness to share your experience in order to help others.”
Sarah Noonan


Gabriela Perez-Espinosa Headshot“I enjoyed the exercise where we learned to write our story with a purpose. I have shared my story verbally many, many times, but to learn to write it down with a flow and purpose was pretty neat. ”
Gabriela Perez-Espinosa


Elisse Barnes Headshot“I learned that there are many types of cancer advocacy: 1) supporting those living with cancer; 2) raising public awareness; 3) fundraising; 4) supporting cancer research and clinical trials; 5) improving the quality of patient care; and 6) influencing legislative and regulatory policies that affect cancer care and research like H.R. 2846, the Planning Actively for Cancer Treatment (PACT) Act.”
Elisse Barnes, JD, PhD


Betsy Glosik Headshot“More than 50 patient advocates from all across the country attended and brought their stories of ovarian, lung, liver, breast, brain, melanoma, and childhood cancers (oh, that’s just naming a few) AND their passion for making a difference in how we improve care and the quality of life for cancer survivors.”
Betsy Glosik


Read about their experiences in full »


CPAT Members’ Local News Coverage

Here are a couple of examples of local media coverage CPAT members received in their communities once they returned home.


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